Book Review: Ink and Bone

Screen Shot 2016-07-09 at 6.46.35 PMInk and Bone by Lisa Unger is not to be confused with Ink and Bone by Rachel Caine, which was also released this year. Although, the book by Caine DOES sound interesting so I might read that one too…but for now I’m talking about Lisa Unger’s new book. Ink and Bone is a supernatural thriller about Finley, a young woman who uses her psychic powers to solve the case of a missing girl. The book follows the people living in and affected by the town of The Hollows after a young girl is abducted. Months pass with no leads so the desperate mother turns to a private detective and his psychic friend as a last ditch effort. This is Finley’s first time trying to use her ability so she’s filled with insecurity and doubt. Unger vividly paints the portrait of a small town where everyone knows everyone. The abduction of this girl has rocked her family to the core and made a mess of their lives. They’re unable to move on even though there’s little hope of finding her alive.

I’ll start with the things I liked about the book. In general I thought it was well written and enjoyed the story. It kept me engaged enough that I finished it in a day when I had a hard time putting it down. I don’t know what it’s like to lose a child, but it seemed like the marriage of the parents was well written. It was flawed and shaky and seemingly always on the verge of completely breaking apart. I particularly resonated with the line, “More than anything else, resentment was the death of love. It killed slowly.” I typically would not be drawn to a story with a supernatural element but this one handled it well. Skepticism was acknowledged and the visions never seemed to overwhelm the narrative.

There were however, a couple of things about the book that bugged me. Finley herself seem like a bit of a cliche. A girl with pink hair who rides a motorcycle and covers her body in tattoos to “make the outside match the inside.” The ending managed to mostly catch me by surprise but in retrospect, it didn’t really seem to make sense. You’ll know what I mean when you read it. Also, Unger seems to have some serious disdain for millennials. There are a couple of times in the book where they’re harshly maligned such as with this gem, “People of her generation were all about texting, which was just one example of their soullessness.” I mean, I get it, everyone hates millennials, let’s move on please. The texting dialogue between young characters was also a bit over the top and she was constantly referencing apps like, “with a flashlight app on his phone” or “she typed the coordinates into an app on her phone.” I don’t know anything about Unger but it seemed like she was either an older person trying to write like she’s hip with this generation, or she was writing for an older generation that would need these things to be explained. I know this is totally nitpicky, but I couldn’t help but roll my eyes in these moments.

Overall I enjoyed the book. It was gripping and fast-paced. I thought the story was well done and the characters felt like real people, outside of the Finley cliche that is. I’d recommend this as a light and quick read if you like thrillers and don’t mind the supernatural.

 

DISCLAIMER: I received a copy of this book in exchange for my unbiased review.

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